Are you new to playing the guitar?

Well, we all have to start somewhere.

Hopefully, you find these 10 Easy Guitar Chords to be a useful resource in helping to boost you into “Guitar God” territory!Separator toolSo , first of all, we have what is called a D Major Open Chord.

Open Chords are those which involve at least 1 open string. In the case of this D Major Open Chord, there is 1 open string, the D string.

This chord can be played in two different ways. You can either play each of the three fingered notes with separate fingers:

  • Index finger on the G string, 2nd fret.
  • Middle finger on the high E string, 2nd fret.
  • Ring finger on the B string, 3rd fret.

Or you could play the two notes on fret 2 with you index finger, barred along the fret. Then simply add your middle finger to the 3rd fret on the B string.

You should strum the following 4 strings: D, G, B, E.

D Major Open ChordSeparator tool

Our next chord is a D Minor Open Chord.

All we have done is moved one of the notes from the D Major Open Chord down one fret.

If you care to understand the theory behind it: what we have done to make a major chord into a minor here, is we have lowered the major 3rd note of a D down a note (semitone) so we can turn it into a Minor 3rd of D, creating a D Minor instead of D Major.

Here is how you should position your fingers:

  • Index finger on the high E string, 1st fret.
  • Middle finger on the G string, 2nd fret.
  • Ring finger on the B string, 3rd fret.
You should strum the following strings: D, G, B, E.D Minor Open ChordSeparator toolNext, we have the C Major Open Chord.

For the easiest way to play this chord, your fingers should be positioned like this:

  • Index finger on the B string, 1st fret.
  • Middle finger on the D string, 2nd fret.
  • Ring finger on the A string, 3rd fret.

You should strum the following strings: A, D, G, B, E.

C Major Open Chord

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Our next chord is much easier!

It’s an E Minor Open Chord.

The best way to position your fingers for this chord is like this:

  • Middle finger on the A string, 2nd fret.
  • Ring finger on the D string, 2nd fret.

For this open chord, every string can be strummed!

E Minor Open Chord Separator tool

I’m not really sure why but this next chord is one which I tend to use a LOT. I find it makes a beautiful resolve-chord. It must be in the vibrations of the strings with this one!

It’s an E Major Open Chord

… and just like before, all we have done is move the minor 3rd of E up a fret to make it a Major 3rd of E. Nice & Easy!

Very similarly to the previous chord, here is the finger positioning:

  • Middle finger on the A string, 2nd fret.
  • Ring finger on the D string, 2nd fret.
  • BUT the Index finger now goes on the G string, 1st fret.

Again, all strings can be strummed here.

E Major Open Chord

Separator toolTime for a slightly more tricky one… here is the A Major Open Chord.

It can be played two ways. The first is to simply bar across the D, G and B strings on the second fret, avoiding strumming the high E string or of course the low E string… but to play it “properly”, here is the best finger positioning:

  • Middle finger on the D string, 2nd fret.
  • Ring finger on the G string, 2nd fret.
  • Introducing… Little finger! on the B string, 2nd fret.

Now I know to begin with, it feels like all of your fingers might be bunched together, making it impossible to play it properly. Believe me, it gets so much easier, so quickly! just stick at it.

For this open chord, only strum the A, D, G, B and E strings. Please avoid the low E string. Although E is already in the chord, the low E tends to somewhat overshadow the other notes.

A Major Open Chord

Separator toolAnother one that you will find in loads of songs out there is the A Minor Open Chord.

The best way to organise your fingers is below:

  • Middle finger on the D string, 2nd fret.
  • Ring finger on the G string, 2nd fret.
  • Index finger on the B string, 1st fret.

For the same reason as the A Major Open Chord, try to avoid the low E string. It’s just too low for the rest of the chord to be properly heard. other 5 strings are perfect for this chord though: A, D, G, B, high E.

A Minor Open Chord

Separator toolThe G Major Open Chord might be a stretch at first!

but totally worth it.

There are “baby” versions of this chord, like only playing the highest 3 strings for example (the G, B and high E strings, using the same fingered notes as on the diagram below).

But here is how to play the full open chord:

  • Middle finger on the low E string, 3rd fret.
  • Index finger on the A string, 2nd fret.
  • Ring finger on the high E string, 3rd fret.

Again, a bit of a stretch but no doubt you’ll need to use this chord if you’re going to be learning other people’s songs!

You should strum all 6 strings here.

G Major Open Chord

Separator toolOur final two chords are technically the same. They are variation on playing the same chord. One is a simplified version of the other.

So first let’s look at the Simplified F Major Chord

Notice it’s not an Open chord. There are no open strings here and I’ve decided to show you the simpler version first so that you have an option for how you want to play an F Major chord.

Here are the finger positions for the simplified F Major:

  • Index finger should bar/cover the High E and the B strings, 1st fret.
  • Middle finger on the G string, 2nd fret.
  • Ring finger on the D string, 3rd fret.

You should only strum the following strings: D, G, B, high E.

F Major - simplified

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Finally, the complete version of an F Major Chord.

The updated finger positions are below:

  • Instead of only barring/covering the high E and B strings, your Index finger should bar ALL 6 strings on fret 1 (acting as a capo).
  • Middle finger on the G string, fret 2.
  • Ring finger on the D string, fret 3.
  • And your Little finger on the A string, fret 3.

Here, you should strum all 6 strings.

Agreeably the most difficult chord on this list but it becomes much easier, very quickly! Stick at it and you’ll be writing your own music in no time at all.

F Major

Keep Playing & Good Luck
Jake McCullough

Director of Content, Buden Bay

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10 Quick & Easy Guitar Chords For Beginners - Pin Art